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14th Annual Conference of Agricultural Economics Society of Ethiopia (AESE)

The 14th Annual Conference of Agricultural Economics Society of Ethiopia (AESE) under the theme ‘The Role of Agriculture in Transforming the Ethiopian Economy: Challenges and Opportunities’ was held 8-10 December 2011 at Ghion Hotel, Addis Ababa. EfD Ethiopia senior research fellow, Dr. Zenebe Gebreegziabher, presented a paper on Land Degradation in Ethiopia: What Do Stoves Have to Do with it?

The 14th Annual Conference of Agricultural Economics Society of Ethiopia was held between Dec 8-10, 2011. The sub-themes of the conference were

  • Agricultural development led industrialization 
  • Linkage of agriculture with other sector of the economy
  • Performance of the agriculture sector
  • Small farmers' commercialization in Ethiopian agriculture
  • Food security and safety nets
  • Natural resource management
  • Climate change and vulnerability
  • Improved agricultural technology dissemination and adoption

 

EfD Ethiopia senior research fellow, Dr. Zenebe Gebreegziabher presented a paper on

 

 

Land Degradation in Ethiopia: What Do Stoves Have To Do With It?

Abstract

In Ethiopia deforestation is a major problem and many peasants have switched from fuelwood to dung for cooking and heating purposes, thereby damaging the agricultural productivity of cropland. The government has embarked on a two-pronged policy in an effort to stem deforestation and the degradation of agricultural lands: (i) tree planting (afforestation); and (ii) dissemination of more efficient stove technologies. This paper investigates the potential of the strategy of disseminating improved stoves in the rehabilitation of agricultural and forests lands, using a dataset on a cross-section of 200 farm households from the highlands of Tigrai region, northern Ethiopia. Results indicate that farm households in Tigrai region of Ethiopia are willing to adopt new/improved stove innovations if these result in economic savings. Moreover, results suggest a significant positive impact in slowing the degradation of agricultural and forested lands. On a per household basis, we found that adopters collect about 70 kg less wood and about 20 kg less dung each month, which indicates that adoption of improved stoves reduces harvest pressure on local forest stands. In terms of wood alone, assuming an average of 120 metric ton of biomass per ha, we found the potential reduction in deforestation amounts to some 1,200 ha per year, not an inconsequential savings.

For more information please contact Dr. Zenebe Gebreegizabher at zenebeg2002@yahoo.com.