Skip to main content

News

2017-10-19

EfD Annual Meeting 2017: Information for participants

This year the EfD annual meeting  will be held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia from:  October 27-30, 2017. It is hosted by the Environment and Climate Research Center (EfD - Ethiopia) and the EfD Secretariat. The EfD annual meeting is a forum to bring together researchers from all EfD centers and their collaborators. EfD would also like to attract key stakeholders for exchange of research ideas. Updates for participants will be displayed here.

2017-01-26

Request for concept notes to develop collaborative multi-site research projects

SETI (http://seti.duke.edu/) invites concept notes to seed collaborative research related to energy transitions. We particularly welcome proposals for work related to the SETI priority themes, including: Consequences of energy poverty, defined as a lack of reliable access to electricity and other modern fuels Drivers of the energy transition in low- and middle-income contexts, including lessons from past experiences Impacts of energy transitions at various scales (households, firms, and the regional and global environment) Policy levers and solutions to speed the energy transition; and analysis of their effectiveness Notable gaps in research on energy transitions

2017-01-04

Fellowship for Environmental Studies at Duke Kunshan

Duke Kunshan University is now accepting applications for the new international Master of Environmental Policy (iMEP) Program. The iMEP program is a two-year degree offered jointly by Duke’s Sanford School of Public Policy and Nicholas School of the Environment.  Students will study core courses in both environmental management and public policy at Duke Kunshan University (China) and Duke University (United States).  We would really appreciate it if you could share this information with people who might be interested. 

2016-10-22

EfD-RFF hosts training workshops on forest conservation webtools

EfD- RFF Coordinator and Senior Research Fellow Allen Blackman organized and led training workshops on two forest conservation webtools developed by an RFF Project Team that includes Jessica Chu, Alex Egorenkov, Len Goff, and Juha Siikamäki. The first workshop, on October 12, was for stakeholders representing US-based institutions and the second, on October 17 and 18, was for stakeholders representing Mesoamerican-based institutions. The webtools, which are for targeting and evaluating forest conservation policies, will be publically launched in the coming months via a webinar. Their development was mainly funded by NASA’s SERVIR program. The training workshops were sponsored by and held at SESYNC in Annapolis, Maryland. 

2016-06-02

RFF hosted their “First Wednesday” Seminars

April 6, 2016. Senior Fellow and RFF EfD Program Director Allen Blackman organized and moderated RFF “First Wednesday” Seminar/webinar on “Reducing Deforestaton in Commodity Supply Chains.” About the Event:

2014-02-28

RFF Postdoctoral Research Fellow Position

Resources for the Future (RFF) has an opening for a Postdoctoral Research Fellow to work on a multi-year project funded by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) that is using remote sensing data to target and evaluate forest conservation policies in Latin America.

2013-06-28

Welcoming three new EfD centers

The ambition to make EfD a truly global network of research centers devoted to the application of environmental economics for development is now being acted upon. The Coordination Committee of the EfD Initiative welcomed three new centers as EfD members.

2012-08-13

Gunnar Köhlin interviewed in Resources

The latest issue of RFF Resources magazine is a special issue on "Balancing Economic and Environmental Progress in Developing Countries". It is being guest edited by EfD Research Fellow Allen Blackman, RFF Senior Fellow, and contains an interview with EfD Director Gunnar Köhlin as well as articles by Professor Thomas Sterner and other EfD members.

2011-05-03

How Regressive Are Fuel Taxes? A Comparison of Countries from Around the World

Thomas Sterner makes the latest addition to RFF policy commentary series with a piece on whether fuel taxes are indeed regressive. Raising fuel taxes could significantly reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and other pollution from the transportation sector. One of the prime arguments against raising fuel taxes is the perception that they are regressive — that they are more costly to the poor and other socioeconomic groups. But recent research suggests the opposite, particularly for developing countries.