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Lecture videos

Environmental Policy Lecture 17 part 1

In lecture 17 Professor Stefan Ambec (Co-editor of Environmental and Resource Economics Research Director at INRA, Toulouse) goes through some modeling generalizing the model from his last lecture (14) and he illustrates this by creating examples showing how to tackle various environmental problems, like water pollution in rivers.

Environmental Policy Lecture 14 part 3

Professor Ambec starts part 3 by reminding us that low cost firms have incentives to mimic high cost firms and foul regulators when there is asymmetric information. He also shows mathematically how to deal with asymmetric information and the “regulator’s maximization program under adverse selection”.

Environmental Policy Lecture 14 part 2

In part 2 Professor Ambec continues the comparison between emission caps and taxes under the given setting from part 1. He shows how to minimize the loss of welfare to society and when it is better to use a cap and tax respectively. For example, which is best when the damage slope is rather flat?

Environmental Policy Lecture 14 part 1

Lecture 14 is given by Professor Stefan Ambec, Co-editor of Environmental and Resource Economics Research Director at INRA, Toulouse, who has a background in microeconomics.  He has given three lectures and in this first one he discusses the topics of “choice of policy instruments” and “asymmetric information”, an example of the later is when the cost of abatement is unknown to the regulator but the firm(s) knows about their own abatement costs.

Environmental Policy Lecture 10 part 3

Professor Sterner starts part 3 by discussing congestion pricing, and mentions the fact that when you take the car when there is a lot of traffic not only are you delayed by the traffic but you also waste more gasoline than you would have if there were no congestion and you also delay maybe a thousand other people by some second due to your decision of taking the car. So what are the social costs? And what are the effect of congestion taxes?

Environmental Policy Lecture 10 part 2

Professor Sterner starts part 2 by emphasizing what he said in the end of part 1 about how media and politicians often confuse those two aspects and state for example that taxes are good because they give revenue or that permits are better for industry and so on, but they then miss that there are both tax and permit schemes which are adapted to compensate/suit all parts.

Environmental Policy Lecture 10 part 1

Professor Sterner discusses the topic of “The Distributions of the Costs” and shows two curves, one of the Environmental benefits and one of the abatement cost implied when you for example tax some emission. He explains why companies benefit on voluntary agreements and gives an intriguing example from Japan.

Environmental Policy Lecture 9 part 1

In lecture 9 the Professor presents some of her latest papers, the first being about Hotelling, Emissions Leakage, and Climate Policy Alternatives. The professor starts by presenting the hotelling model, discussing the effects of lowering the backstop cost and The Green Paradox, which she calls as a “depressing constraint to the literature” since technology innovation and green policies (according to the Green Paradox) might accelerate emissions as the nonrenewable resource market response might be to accelerate extraction and emissions while the price is still favorable.

Environmental Policy Lecture 8b part 2

In a not so technical lecture Professor Sterner discusses the topic of Property rights and the ”Tragedy of the Commons”, an expression founded in 1968 by Garrett Hardin claiming that where there are free access to some resource people will try to reap of as much as possible from it for their personal gain, until the resource collapses. 

Environmental Policy Lecture 8b part 1

In a not so technical lecture Professor Sterner discusses the topic of Property rights and the ”Tragedy of the Commons”, an expression founded in 1968 by Garrett Hardin claiming that where there are free access to some resource people will try to reap of as much as possible from it for their personal gain, until the resource collapses.

Environmental Policy Lecture 8 part 2

In lecture 8 Professor Sterner speaks about discounting, an exiting topic as he calls the discount rate as being the value of the future. In spite of all uncertainties there are about impacts of Climate Change the biggest uncertainty considering its future costs comes from the discount rate. 

Environmental Policy Lecture 7 part 2

In lecture 7 Professor Peter Berck, who is S.J. Hall Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of California, Berkeley, gives an overview of environmental policy in the US. Berck explains the importance and role the state of California has managed to obtain for affecting the rest of the US environmental policy. He explains how their decisions influence other states, as for example their regulation of Green House Gases and how other states with democratic rule follows.

Environmental Policy Lecture 7 part 1

In lecture 7 Professor Peter Berck, who is S.J. Hall Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of California, Berkeley, gives an overview of environmental policy in the US. Berck explains the importance and role the state of California has managed to obtain for affecting the rest of the US environmental policy. He explains how their decisions influence other states.

Environmental Policy Lecture 6

Lecture 6 presents the story of how sulfur and NOx emissions have been cut. Sterner starts his lecture by giving the example of acidification and how Swedish lakes died out mainly from German and British sulfur emissions while down on the European continent and in the UK the problem was slim. A situation originating from differences in bedrock and wind patterns. Through sulfur taxes Sweden basically eliminated their sulfur emissions and later managed to influence the other countries to cut their emissions as well.

Environmental Policy Lecture 5 part 2

In this lecture the professor discusses how to model emissions pricing, which can be implemented by for example a tax or a cap and trade system. When it comes to abating firms face the choice of either reducing emissions intensity or producing less. Does for example the optimal emissions price equal the marginal damage? How are firms affected? And what incentives does firms have with an abatement scheme as Grandfathering?

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